Common Questions

What are your office hours?

My office hours are by appointment only.


Is your office handicap accessible?

Accessing my office does require navigating stairs. There are several stairs in the front of the building and one flight of stairs inside the building up to my suite. 


How do I prepare for my first session?

After scheduling your first appointment, you will receive an email with a link to my client portal.  Within the portal you will find the intake paperwork that you will need to review and sign prior to your first appointment. If you are utilizing telehealth services, you will receive a text and/or email appointment reminder two days prior to our session.  Embedded in that reminder will be the link for the session.


Do I really need therapy? I can usually handle my problems. 

Everyone goes through challenging situations in life, and while you may have successfully navigated through other difficulties you've faced, there's nothing wrong with seeking extra support when you need it. In fact, therapy is for people who have enough self-awareness to realize they need a helping hand, and that is something to be admired. You are taking responsibility by accepting where you're at in life and making a commitment to change the situation by seeking therapy. Therapy provides long-lasting benefits and support, giving you the tools you need to avoid triggers, re-direct damaging patterns, and overcome whatever challenges you face. 

How do I know if it is right for me?

People have many different motivations for coming to psychotherapy. Some may be going through a major life transition (unemployment, divorce, new job, etc.), or are not handling stressful circumstances well. Some people need assistance managing a range of other issues such as low self-esteem, depression, anxiety, addictions, relationship problems, spiritual conflicts and creative blocks. Therapy can help provide some much needed encouragement and help with skills to get them through these periods. Others may be at a point where they are ready to learn more about themselves or want to be more effective with their goals in life. In short, people seeking psychotherapy are ready to meet the challenges in their lives and ready to make changes in their lives. 


How does confidentiality work in therapy?

Confidentiality is one of the most important components between a client and psychotherapist. Successful therapy requires a high degree of trust with highly sensitive subject matter that is usually not discussed anywhere but the therapist's office. Every therapist should provide a written copy of their confidential disclosure agreement, and you can expect that what you discuss in session will not be shared with anyone. This is called “Informed Consent”. Sometimes, however, you may want your therapist to share information or give an update to someone on your healthcare team (your Physician, Naturopath, Attorney), but by law your therapist cannot release this information without obtaining your written permission.

  However, state law and professional ethics require therapists to maintain confidentiality except for the following situations:   

* Suspected past or present abuse or neglect of children, adults, and elders to the authorities, including Child Protection and law enforcement, based on information provided by the client or collateral sources. 

* If the therapist has reason to suspect the client is seriously in danger of harming him/herself or has threatened to harm another person.






Contact Us

We look forward to hearing from you

Location

Office Hours

Monday:

By Appointment Only

Tuesday:

By Appointment Only

Wednesday:

By Appointment Only

Thursday:

By Appointment Only

Friday:

By Appointment Only

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed